4 results for month: 03/2009


Scaling the Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactor: The Big Lots Reactor and the Aim High Reactor

believe that we have reached the point in our understanding of the potential thorium/Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactor future, where we can talk about our grand plan. I believe that we can show that the use of thorium fuel cycle LFTRs represents, if not the silver bullet, then at least the thorium bullet of future energy. The most important questions which we need to answer about thorium cycle/LFTR technology are:1. Can it be built at a reasonable cost?2. Is is scalable enough to meet our energy needs?3. Can we complete world wide deployment of carbon technology replacing LFTR by what is often seen as the cut off date of 2050?The answers to these ...

LFTR Power for a Stable Grid

I have suggested on several occasions that several unique features of the Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactor (and other molten salt reactors) makes it suitable for several important roles in supplying electricity to the electrical grid as demand shifts over time. Daily and seasonable shifts in electrical demand require part time generating capacity, that can be brought on line as demand increases, and withdrawn as it declines. In addition to the predictable variations in customer demand, a quick response reserve generating capacity is required as protection against a sudden loss of generating capacity. Power plants may go off line at short notice due ...

The NEI and Me

David Walters and I had an online conversation yesterday. It was clear from the conversation why we are both bloggers, and why we are nuclear bloggers. We discovered during the course of the conversation that we were among the few people in the world to have watched the NEI's YouTube videos of its President and CEO Marvin S. Fertel's February 12 Wall Street Briefing. I was very impressed with Fertel, who came across as intelligent and articulate, and aware of many of the issues that I raise. The NEI's YouTube videos were so poorly edited that I suspect that the NEI outsourced that job to Greenpeace. Greenpeace also appears to be in control of ...

Alexander DeVolpi versus Amory Lovins: Part II

Alexander DeVolpi has offered a serious critique of Amory Lovins that That i believe accurately raises questions about Mr. Lovins' authority. DeVolpi, points out that Because Lovins renders no substantive academic or acquired nuclear credentials, the analyses he presents ought to be held to a strict standard of scientific credibility, such as that described by the Daubert U.S. Supreme Court decision. . . . This is in lieu of granting him interim benefit of doubt, a courtesy often extended to individuals who have an established scientific reputation . . . In other words, I would advise treating Lovins’ renderings on nuclear issues with healthy, but ...