Another Fossil-Fuel Tragedy, 11 missing

11 workers are still missing and presumed dead after an explosion and fire on an oil-drilling platform in the Gulf of Mexico.

Once again, we see that fossil fuels kill. Regularly. So far in this still-new year we’ve had an explosion on February 7 at a natural gas plant killing six, a refinery explosion on April 2 killing five workers, a terrible coal mine explosion on April 5 killing 29 miners, and now an oil rig explosion on April 20 likely killing 11.

So coal, oil, and gas have killed 51 people, or nearly a person every other day. Is this acceptable in our modern energy-starved society?

There is a better way:

Comments

comments


13 Replies to "Another Fossil-Fuel Tragedy, 11 missing"

  • Paul Wick
    April 22, 2010 (9:24 am)
    Reply

    Another worker died in the hospital about a week ago, after the refinery explosion in Anacortes, Wash., bringing the death toll to six.

  • vboring
    April 22, 2010 (9:30 am)
    Reply

    Is there a way to link deaths to wind and solar power?

    People falling off roofs, solar panels unexpectedly backfeeding distribution circuits and electrocuting lineworkers, or maintenance workers getting caught in the wind turbine gear box?

    I wonder if it is possible to put together a death count per GWe for various energy technologies in the US.

  • Laura Louzader
    April 22, 2010 (2:00 pm)
    Reply

    Well, yes, there is one sure way to link deaths to wind and solar, because they are dependent upon fossil fuel backups or they don't work.

    If we rely on wind and solar, we will really be relying on gas and coal- "clean" coal, maybe, but we will still be reliant upon fossil fue.s

  • Adam
    April 22, 2010 (4:34 pm)
    Reply

    Happy Earth Day!

  • howhow
    April 22, 2010 (10:39 pm)
    Reply

    Here is a link to a chart describing deaths/GWy; http://www.inference.phy.cam.ac.uk/withouthotair/
    Nuclear is the safest even wind and solar!
    Howard

  • Scott
    April 23, 2010 (1:35 pm)
    Reply

    For a presentation on the LFTR I need a ping-pong sized ball of Lead, to represent a life-times supply of energy from Thorium. Any ideas where I could acquire this?

  • Jason Ribeiro
    April 23, 2010 (5:07 pm)
    Reply

    Scott, I think a local fishing tackle and bait shop might have the kind of lead balls you are looking for, maybe.

  • Steve
    April 25, 2010 (3:59 am)
    Reply

    It not just the accidents that are killing people. Coal mining and combustion is polluting the environment. La Trobe Valley near Melbourne, Australia is the center of coal mining and electricity production in Victoria and has a cancer rate 7 times the national average.
    http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2010/04/12/286http://www.conservationmaven.com/frontpage/study-

  • Paul Wick
    April 25, 2010 (11:27 am)
    Reply

    A seventh worker died yesterday as a result of burns from the Anacortes Washington refinery explosion.
    http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/localnews/2

  • David
    April 26, 2010 (5:26 pm)
    Reply

    You'll be glad to hear that the LFTR was mentioned in passing on a televised TV debate in Ireland involving the Minister for Energy on the future of energy. Just a mention however but word is spreading.

  • Antice
    April 29, 2010 (3:25 pm)
    Reply

    I love the picture with the lifetime supply of energy in the palm of a hand. now that is a strong message right there.

    The death-toll from fossil fuels is horrendous. It's just makes me cringe whenever i think about it. we really need to get off of that crap and onto something cleaner.

  • Keith Dill
    April 30, 2010 (9:54 am)
    Reply

    Accidental deaths are just a fraction of the deaths associated with the use of fossil fuels. An old book from the 70's titled The Health Hazards of Not Going Nuclear identifies government stats on increased cancer deaths for people living along the prevailing wind path of coal power plants. These are ongoing deaths to people that did not sign up for "hazardous" work conditions such as those found on oil drilling platforms.

  • Rasmus
    May 18, 2010 (8:15 am)
    Reply

    Interesting post by Dmitry Orlov: "An American Chernobyl":
    http://cluborlov.blogspot.com/2010/05/american-ch


Leave a Reply