11 results for author: Robert Hargraves


LFTR leader JIANG Mianheng addresses iThEO

Jiang Mianheng gave the lead-off presentation at the International Thorium Energy Organization 2012 meeting in Shanghai, sponsored by the Shanghai Institute of Nuclear and Applied Physics and the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). Jiang Mianheng is the son of former president Jiang Zemin and a leader of CAS. After publication of Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactors in the July/August 2010 American Scientist he led a delegation to Oak Ridge National Laboratory to learn more about the ORNL molten salt reactors experience. In January 2011 the CAS announced a $350 million 5 year thorium MSR project engaging 400 people. Videographer Gordon McDowell ...

THORIUM: energy cheaper than coal

THORIUM: energy cheaper than coal has just been published and is available from Amazon. Click on the cover image for more information, including hundreds of links for reference or further study. Thorium energy can help us check CO2 and global warming, cut deadly air pollution, provide inexhaustible energy increase human prosperity Our world is beset by global warming, pollution, resource conflicts, and energy poverty. Millions die from coal plant emissions. We war over mideast oil. Food supplies from sea and land are threatened. Developing nations' growth exacerbates the crises. Few nations will adopt carbon taxes or energy policies against ...

Ammoniac Nucléaire

Energy from Thorium reader Raul Parolari thought that some of our posts should be presented in other languages, so he offered this translation to French. French translation follows...

Nuclear Cement

In the recent Nuclear Ammonia article post, ammonia was illustrated as a fuel that could propel vehicles in a zero carbon era. Despite our best efforts in developing new internal combustion engines and direct ammonia fuel cells, there will continue to be a role for carbonaceous fuels. Gasoline and jet fuel have double the volumetric energy capacity of liquid ammonia. A given fuel tank can only contain half as much ammonia combustion potential energy as gasoline combustion potential energy. Fuel tank size is very important in aircraft. Decades of engineering of airframes and turbine engines have optimized aircraft performance using diesel-like JP8 jet ...

Nuclear Ammonia

The liquid fluoride thorium reactor (LFTR) has the potential to make electric power cheaper than from coal. Typical costs for electric power bought by US utilities average around 5-6 cents per kilowatt hour generated by coal, hydro, and natural gas sources. Government regulations are requiring utilities to buy solar- and wind-generated power at 20-30 cents/kWh. LFTR's potential cost advantage of 3 cents/kWh is the economic incentive to stop burning CO2-emitting coal, without economically injurious carbon taxes and politically obscured feed-in tariffs. In this way LFTR can improve both the environment and the economy. Click to read full post...

Liquid Fuel Nuclear Reactors

The American Physical Society forum on Physics and Society has just published its quarterly newsletter, containing two articles about nuclear power, including one by Robert Hargraves and Ralph Moir, Liquid Fuel Nuclear Reactors. Today’s familiar pressurized water nuclear reactors use solid fuel -- pellets of uranium dioxide in zirconium fuel rods bundled into fuel assemblies. These assemblies are placed within the reactor vessel under water at 160 atmospheres pressure and a temperature of 330°C. This hot water transfers heat from the fissioning fuel to a steam turbine that spins a generator to make electricity. Alvin Weinberg invented the ...

Blue Ribbon Commission learns about thorium

On August 30 Robert Hargraves presented a ten-minute version of Aim High to the Reactor and Fuel Cycle Subcommittee of the President's Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future. All the presentations are posted here by the commission. The commission will not recommend any specific technology such as LFTR, but this presentation might nudge them closer to recommending policy changes for NRC that would facilitate SMR (small and medium reactor) licensing, and also support technology neutral licensing, so that technologies differing from today's standard light water reactors might be approved. Here is the text of the presentation, one paragr...

Energy cheaper than from coal

When economic well-being measured by the gross domestic product exceeds a threshold, birthrate drops sharply. Global warming now threatens irreversible climate damage, ending glacial water flows needed to sustain food production for hundreds of millions of people, and shrinking the polar cold water regions of the ocean where algae start the ocean food chain. Atmospheric CO2 dissolving into the ocean acidifies it, killing corals and stressing ocean life. Demand for biofuels increases destruction of CO2 absorbing forests and jungles. Burning coal for power is the largest source of atmospheric CO2, which drives global warming. Airborne coal soot ...

Welcome American Scientist readers

The July/August 2010 issue of American Scientist magazine has a ten-page article, Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactors, by Robert Hargraves and Ralph Moir. The article ends with a link to this web site, so welcome to you and other newbies. This redesigned site is rich with information; here's a guide for those with inquiring minds. Start at the very top of the page at the eight links in lower case separated by bars. Click on "about" for a short introduction to thorium, the research history, and a graphic representation of the liquid fluoride thorium reactor, LFTR. Click "msrp" to read the summary of the molten salt research program at the Oak Ridge ...

Energy Cheaper than from Coal

I look forward to presenting Liquid Fuel Nuclear Reactors talk at the Thorium Energy Alliance symposium at the Googleplex next week. Part of that talk will remind us that the liquid fluoride thorium reactor is capable of producing energy cheaper than from coal. Cap and trade and carbon taxes have faded from public attention. No agreement was reached in Copenhagen because the developing nations would not accept taxes that limited their potential for economic growth. From their point of view, the OECD nations achieved their wealth from cheap energy, from burning coal. A way to dissuade nations from burning coal is to provide an economically superior ...