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PostPosted: Sep 06, 2008 7:05 am 
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U.S., India nuclear deal approved
Sep 06, 2008 07:33 AM
The Associated Press

VIENNA–The Nuclear Suppliers Group approved a contentious U.S. plan to sell peaceful nuclear material technology to India, delegates at the 45-nation talks said Saturday.

The officials, who met in Vienna, spoke to the Associated Press on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss the closed door proceedings.

But they said the talks overcame misgivings expressed by Austria, Ireland and New Zealand. One delegate said Saturday's session produced "a total consensus" on the deal, which would reverse more than three decades of U.S. policy toward India.

India has tested atomic weapons and refused to sign international nonproliferation treaties.

The U.S. needed approval from the nuclear group, which governs the legal trade in nuclear components and technology.

The deal still also needs authorization from U.S. Congress, and the Bush administration has been racing to get acceptance before lawmakers recess for the rest of the year to devote time to their re-election campaigns.

Austria issued a statement saying it lifted its objections after India pledged Friday not to touch off a new nuclear arms race or share sensitive nuclear technology with other countries. Austria's government called that pledge "decisive.''

Before the nuclear group approved the deal, U.S. officials had contended that selling peaceful nuclear technology to India would bring the country's atomic program under closer scrutiny and boost – not undermine – international nonproliferation efforts.


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PostPosted: Sep 06, 2008 4:41 pm 
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Wow, so which companies are the best candidates to leverage off these developments?

India's top nuclear civil servant, Anil Kakodkar, has stated that India intends to go continue with its 3-stage nuclear development program (ie. thorium power)

http://www.thehindubusinessline.com/200 ... 300300.htm


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PostPosted: Sep 06, 2008 6:05 pm 
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sanman wrote:
India's top nuclear civil servant, Anil Kakodkar, has stated that India intends to go continue with its 3-stage nuclear development program (ie. thorium power)

In the last posted issue of Nuclear India Anil Kakodkar talks about the "negative effects of early thorium introduction."
Quote:
Introduction of thorium without going to FBRs is extremely counter productive, since the installed power capacity with thorium and plutonium being used together in thermal reactors will be unable to rise beyond a rather insignificant value, considering the total Indian requirement. This is illustrated in Figure-8.

Its interesting that the caption in the figure mentions MSRs, while Kakodkar's article makes no mention of them at all.....

Image

He also bemoans the extremely low fuel burnup of thorium-based fuel, that is feasible with the minimum enrichment of 1.8% in PHWRs (about 2.5-times natural uranium enrichment level), which makes recycling totally impractical, and which therefore implies higher fissile loading requirements, which run counter to the needs of a rapid capacity expansion program.

What he neglects to mention is that an HW-MSR with fuel enrichment lower than 1.8% could achieve essentially unlimited fuel burnup, with uranium fuel, thanks to on-line processing.
The low fissile loading would thus allow India to have the rapid capacity expansion program that is otherwise impossible with solid-fueled thermal reactors. It must also be pointed out that this is equally impossible with LFTRs, particularly those w/o graphite moderator, due to their high fissile loading -- comparable to FBRs (but without the benefit of the short fissile doubling time).

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PostPosted: Sep 08, 2008 3:58 am 
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Anil Kakodkar's problem is a shortage of fissile feed in reactors. He or his successor may go for some type of MSR once this problem is sorted out. Right now he is busy constructing a fast reactor that works . I have a feeling that Indian MSR if and when built might be a chloride(Cl37) salt fast spectrum. The current research focus is on metallic fuel in fast reactors for higher breeding ratio.


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PostPosted: Sep 08, 2008 9:41 pm 
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jagdish wrote:
Anil Kakodkar's problem is a shortage of fissile feed in reactors. He or his successor may go for some type of MSR once this problem is sorted out. Right now he is busy constructing a fast reactor that works .

Yeah... problem is that the fast reactor is not much good without reprocessing plants.

With an MSR, you get it in a single package, and a lot simpler (& less expensive) than trying to reprocess oxide or carbide fuels - the current developmental FBRs.

One would think that a country like India would be more cost-conscious, than the rich western nations..... But seeing that India is also dumping money down the ITER hole may perhaps cause one to reconsider ?


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PostPosted: Apr 09, 2017 7:44 am 
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Why the India-US nuclear deal is turning out to be a dud


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PostPosted: Apr 09, 2017 3:12 pm 
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GE built or designed all the three Fukushima reactors that suffered core meltdowns, yet the US firm went scot-free, despite a fundamental design deficiency in the reactors.


What design deficiency are they referring to? The reactors survived the earthquake and flooding, failing only when cooling was lost. The cooling would not have been lost had the tidal wall been built high enough, the reactor NOT been shutdown, or any of a number of things outside the reactor been properly designed and operated. There was nothing fundamentally wrong with the reactors. The failures were in the choice of siting and infrastructure. TEPCO knew about these issues, as did the government regulators, but nothing was done. GE did nothing wrong.

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Disclaimer: I am an engineer but not a nuclear engineer, mechanical engineer, chemical engineer, or industrial engineer. My education included electrical, computer, and software engineering.


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PostPosted: May 02, 2017 4:02 pm 
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Nuclear power: Westinghouse to miss deadline to firm-up India deal

Quote:
India has asked Japanese company Toshiba to offer ways to resolve the issue of sale of nuclear reactors following bankruptcy of its US-based Westinghouse Electric Company. The Westinghouse-Toshiba nuclear reactors deal for making six reactors was to be negotiated by June 2017 but that deadline is sure to fall through, Indian officials told FE.

“The US-based Westinghouse Electric Co filed for bankruptcy protection in March this year. We have to wait for the company to come up with solutions to meet the June deadline,” an official who didn’t want to be named said. According to the official: “Though no money has exchanged hands, and with techno-commercial negotiations of the deal at an advanced stage, any delay or even a cancellation from the US-based company will impact India’s target of tripling its nuclear generating capacity by 2024”.

The contract, when finalised and put into action, is expected to give a big boost to India’s $150-billion nuclear power programme. Prime Minister Narendra Modi and former US president Barack Obama had announced at a summit last year that the Westinghouse deal should be finalised by June 2017. Westinghouse has already been allotted a site in Gujarat to build a nuclear power station with total capacity of 2,500 MW and possibility of expansion in future.


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PostPosted: May 03, 2017 2:51 am 
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The US-French-Japanese nuclear construction is so costly that there are financial problems everywhere. Indian PHWR built in India costs about one-third. It is best for India to buy only uranium abroad.


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PostPosted: Aug 02, 2017 7:39 pm 
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A late response but this caught my eye

Quote:
Westinghouse’s imprudent purchase of a heavily indebted US nuclear constructions service company in late 2015 proved the proverbial last straw for Toshiba.


I think this is really the crux of the problem for the Western firms, they don't want to get involved in construction directly because it'll be hard and ( evidently ) expensive but no 3rd party really has the skillset or desire to do it either and in order to actually get a build finished the firm has to absorb the losses. Rosatom has all this stuff worked out and given their construction schedule and pricing, worked out pretty well and so will continue to trounce western firms, as evidenced by the new VVER builds agreed to in India recently.


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