Energy From Thorium Discussion Forum

It is currently Sep 23, 2018 1:21 pm

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 8 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Jan 19, 2015 9:17 am 
Offline

Joined: Jul 14, 2008 3:12 pm
Posts: 5045
The following article on the excellent World Nuclear website, goes into some detail on India's nuclear site planning and construction.

http://www.world-nuclear.org/info/Count ... G-N/India/

Clearly they are not messing about here. Multiple 6 unit sites of the biggest reactors on the market today, for instance 6x EPR (10200 MWe), 6x ESBWR (9300 MWe) and 6x AP1000 (6900 MWe).

The Indians are thinking BIG.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Jan 19, 2015 4:06 pm 
Offline

Joined: Apr 19, 2008 1:06 am
Posts: 2240
The big reactors would be nice if there was any hint of economy of size. EPR is the most costly reactor per MW and none has been completed so far. I wish they would have more Indian PH WRs besides the VVERs. Even the indigenous PFBR is much cheaper than the EPR.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Jan 20, 2015 10:32 am 
Offline

Joined: Jul 14, 2008 3:12 pm
Posts: 5045
jagdish wrote:
The big reactors would be nice if there was any hint of economy of size. EPR is the most costly reactor per MW and none has been completed so far. I wish they would have more Indian PH WRs besides the VVERs. Even the indigenous PFBR is much cheaper than the EPR.


If wishes where horses, beggars would ride. You guys and gals are building all the HWRs you can muster, I'd reckon. Smart move to get involved with experienced builders and operators such as Westinghouse, GE-H, and AREVA. Cost isn't that high, should be under 5 cents/kWh long term.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Jan 26, 2015 4:00 am 
Offline

Joined: Jul 14, 2008 3:12 pm
Posts: 5045
http://indianexpress.com/article/india/ ... lear-deal/


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Jan 26, 2015 10:47 pm 
Offline

Joined: Apr 19, 2008 1:06 am
Posts: 2240
Right now, the Indian PHWR is the most cost effective reactor, per MW, at least in India. The 384 tube reactor has already been upgraded from 540 to700 MW and there is a lot of scope in change of fuel. Proposed AHWR fuels can be converted to this reactor. Core and blanket arrangement can be used to increase the conversion ratio. It could be used as U233 creator just like earlier Russian and British designs were used for creating plutonium. I guess negotiations with others suppliers besides the Russians have to be continued for political reasons just like the Chinese.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Jan 27, 2015 2:08 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Jan 12, 2010 10:15 am
Posts: 42
Location: Singapore
I do wonder about the impact of the new (at least by appearances) warmer relations between the US and India.

Even though there was a fair bit of hullabaloo about Obama's 'first US presidential visit' during India's republic day, at this point it's hard to determine if this is the usual political posturing or a signal of a real breakthrough in US-India relations. Especially since it can be said that what Obama does, does not necessarily represent the views of the US political establishment.

It's been my long-standing understanding that the Indian 3-stage nuclear programme was born out of the belief that being a 'nuclear pariah' state as a non-signatory to the (rather hypocritical) Non-Proliferation Treaty, India would forever never have access to the U-233 that the US possesses (and ironically has been trying to destroy), thus the 3-stage plan was developed to generate it's own stock of U-233 for use in thorium MSRs.

To be sure, Obama's posturing is as much a counter against China's influence in India as it may be about genuinely improving US-India relations, the question now is how much of this is the former rather than the latter.

It all boils down to whether the US would be willing to give the Indian's the U-233, if they do I highly suspect that we should see a major shortcut in the 3 stage programme becoming the straight rush to the LFTR.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Jan 27, 2015 10:18 am 
Offline

Joined: Jul 14, 2008 3:12 pm
Posts: 5045
I wouldn't read anything like this in these deals. There's no U233 import or export at all. These are all converter reactors, the imported reactors are all U-Pu (mined U) and LEU cycle.

There's a big business side to these decisions. GE is having little luck in the US but has gone through an expensive and tedious design certification. They have to sell some reactors now, not 2 but 20. So Asia is a logical growth market. The fact that it is certified by the US NRC carries great weight in Asia.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Jan 27, 2015 8:14 pm 
Offline

Joined: Aug 31, 2011 12:41 am
Posts: 28
Cyril R wrote:
...GE is having little luck in the US but has gone through an expensive and tedious design certification. They have to sell some reactors now, not 2 but 20. So Asia is a logical growth market. The fact that it is certified by the US NRC carries great weight in Asia.


Bingo. Hopefully getting AP1000 well established in China, India, and a couple in USA will stimulate interest in building more. We can not afford to wait for Gen IV--get the licensed Gen III+ reactors up and running while the Gen IV reactors are in development.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 8 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group