Energy From Thorium Discussion Forum

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PostPosted: Aug 10, 2015 8:04 pm 
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CNBC announced Japan was turning back on a reactor and it would be fully up next month...


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PostPosted: Aug 13, 2015 7:37 am 
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A step in right direction. Let us see if good sense or emotion prevails.


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PostPosted: Aug 14, 2015 7:33 am 
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What sorts of modifications have they done to their remaining plants? I guess this rippled over to new plant mods in the United States, but I don't know what they are. If the diesels had just kept running, would the reactors be in service today?

PR for nukes must be very difficult in Japan these days, but times change and attitudes do change. Odd as it sounds, I wonder whether this could point Japan towards a LFTR with it's passive protection.


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PostPosted: Aug 14, 2015 9:51 pm 
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I could not answer your question(s). However, apparently there was lots of protesting about the return to nuclear in Japan. Germany, if I am not mistaken, has greatly pulled back on its alternative programs and the solar and wind industries in Germany are in decline. Maybe nuclear will make a come back under Merkel after all. Supposedly she was ready to expand nuclear just prior to the Japanese problem. I read someplace an analysis that showed for every job created in the alternate energy sectors, three jobs were lost -- not a good economic model plus the price of electricity increased on all Germany's electrical customers.

It would take some time to research the sources of the statements above, but for those inclined, you can read several analyses that pretty much reveal a pattern of economic problems following alternative energy expansions. It is not new news.

Hopefully Japan will get back into helping develop new nuclear, maybe even LFTRs.


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PostPosted: Aug 15, 2015 7:24 am 
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Hopefully Japan will get back into helping develop new nuclear, maybe even LFTRs.


That would be great to see. The US is awash in natural gas. Since necessity is the mother of invention, that mother ain't around in the US. However, I think she is in Japan, a land locked nation with few natural resources other than an intelligent trained workforce. In my lifetime, I've seen the Japanese make things work that the business leaders who run US industries would not pursue. I think they could take the LFTR idea and do this. Then they could sell it to the world.

The Japanese have paid a lot to import oil since their nukes have been shut down. This has been like a tax on the Japanese people.

I did a bit of looking to see how Fukushima affected US reactors. It looks like it's more bureaucracy and pencil whipping of the problem to show it is not a real problem. It also looks like some mods are being done to fuel pool areas. These could be warranted as I remember seeing some housed in cheap metal buildings in years past.


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PostPosted: Aug 15, 2015 9:41 am 
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The world can't admit they need nuclear energy so they quietly keep reactors going. In this case, what else was Japan going to do? The sad part is that, unlike every other technology that continues to improve and innovate, nuclear systems are forced to be stagnate. Yes they are safe, but they are only as safe as 50 year old designs and infrastructure can be maintained. They can be made much safer with a liquid core approach.

They produce cheap energy as verified by the continued funding and rebuilding. If they were not safe and were not the only economical alternative, they would never be rebuilt and fade into history like every other outdated thing. Only we could make them more efficient and much more economically attractive if we wanted.

I am glad Japan was able to rebuild and hopefully learn from the disaster. They should not just look for a short term fix of higher and thicker sea walls, but a long term renewal in the entire nuclear power architecture. One that is small, efficient and inherently safe. They may also find it is more profitable and more publicly acceptable in the longterm.


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PostPosted: Aug 15, 2015 11:25 am 
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For US response to Fukushima see http://www.nrc.gov/reactors/operating/o ... ities.html


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PostPosted: Aug 15, 2015 11:54 am 
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Yea!!! I was really afraid that they were done with nuclear power. Frankly, I was surprised they ever had nuclear in the first place given Hiroshima & Nagasaki. Respect! I would also like to see a comprehensive list of what upgrades & changes in policy they established. Hopefully, Germany will now pull their collective heads out of their butts and we'll get back to moving forward in nuclear science.

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PostPosted: Aug 16, 2015 4:43 pm 
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Here's a brief list of upgrades and changes at the Sendai plant.

Physical measures

    Anti-tsunami barrier erected around the seawater pumps that supply cooling water
    Power-supply trucks onsite
    Cooling-water pump trucks onsite
    Tornado cover for the external condensate storage tank
    Satellite phones and transceivers set up to be available at all times
    Firebreak to prevent forest fires from spreading

Policy measures
    Appointed a commander dedicated to accident-related matters for the Nos. 1 and 2 reactors
    Added more than 10 workers for a total of 52. Among them, 36 were exclusively tasked with accident preparation and response
    Ran about 460 emergency drills
    Raised estimate of the acceleration caused by the maximum credible earthquake to 620 gal from the previous 540-gal estimate
    Raised its maximum credible tsunami from four meters to five meters

From: http://the-japan-news.com/news/article/0002351622


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PostPosted: Aug 18, 2015 2:34 am 
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They have an additional problem
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/17/opini ... .html?_r=1
They could follow the trials in Norway for solution.
http://www.extremetech.com/extreme/1601 ... ree-energy


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PostPosted: Aug 18, 2015 3:37 pm 
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jagdish wrote:
They have an additional problem
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/17/opini ... .html?_r=1
They could follow the trials in Norway for solution.
http://www.extremetech.com/extreme/1601 ... ree-energy

So are you going to demonize plutonium to defend Thorium ?
Does Japan have any weapons grade plutonium ?
Japan is a developed country with a very functional law enforcement system.

I would expect better of you jagdish.
If Japan has reactor grade plutonium separated, it will make for great Pu+Th solid or liquid fuel.
If its simple spent nuclear fuel (mostly U238), its not even a great dirty bomb material.

Why don't we focus on real problems instead ?

Like you I'm very anxious for news on Thor Energy Halden efforts, but I think current nuclear is much better even than burning natural gas.

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PostPosted: Apr 24, 2017 3:47 pm 
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Tepco contemplates 2019 restart for giant Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear plant

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Tepco is considering reopening four of the seven reactors at the plant over a roughly three-year period through May 2021. The utility will present the proposed schedule in a restructuring plan due to be submitted to the government, possibly by the end of the month, the sources said. The Kashiwazaki-Kariwa complex is the world’s largest nuclear plant by capacity when all seven units are in online. The boiling-water reactors are the same type as those hit by core meltdowns at Tepco’s Fukushima No. 1 plant in 2011. Tepco hopes the restart will help stabilize its finances as it deals with up to ¥22 trillion ($202 billion) in decommissioning and compensation costs from the Fukushima disaster.


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