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PostPosted: Feb 06, 2014 7:31 pm 
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Hi there,

i am new here, but i am long term supporter of thorium energy. I was thinking today about this:

Do you think that there will be a country in the not that distant future that can produce 100% of its consumed electricity from nuclear power plants? What was the highest nuclear share of electricity production in any country (not just today, but also in the past)?

I am from Slovakia and we are second overall (from % perspective) behind France, but 2 new reactors are coming online this, respectively next year. Here is my calculation of the nuclear share after those 2 reactors will come online, please correct me if i am wrong about it, i am an economist/businessman not an physicists :oops:

Slovakia 2013
Energy consumption: 28,8 TWh (2013 numbers)
Installed nuclear capacity 1,816 MW(e)
Actual share of nuclear energy on energy consumption: 53,8% (wikipedia)
Capacity factor of nuclear power plants: 97,4% (please check me if i calculated it right)

Slovakia 2015
2 new reactors coming online with 500+500 MW(e) installed capacity
Energy consumption: 29,5 TWh (i found this estimate on one page about energy)
Installed nuclear capacity 2,816 MW(e)
-capacity factor stays the same
Actual share of nuclear energy on energy consumption: 81,5%

So we should have a bigger share of nuclear energy than France if i calculated it the right way.

But the more interesting part is this - our politicians are in active talks to build another nuclear reactor at one of our existing power plants, this time a big one with an installed capacity in the order of 1200-1750 MW(e). They want to have it online before 2025. The land for it was already bought and they are now actively searching for a suitable reactor supplier.

Quote:
According to the INESS’s calculations, electricity production in Slovakia would exceed domestic consumption by about 40 percent if another nuclear source was built


So we would be not only the first country that can produce 100% of its electricity from nuclear power plants but we could also actually produce more than that.

I know its sounds ridiculous, but our politicians are also planning to build another big nuclear power plant after 2025 :shock: . I should also note, that we were forced to shut down 2 perfectly fine reactors as a condition to be permitted into the European Union. If we had those 2 reactors still operational, then we would achieve 100% of nuclear share maybe even in 2015.

You cant imagine how supportive is the public here about nuclear energy. Like absolutely crazy supportive + they attack solar/wind and label it as a scam. They want only nuclear. Of course not everyone is like that, but it fits the majority of people over here. There is virtually no real opposition for nuclear. We are also participating on the research of gen IV reactors, namely the Gas-cooled fast reactor and its possible that a prototype will be build here (Allegro)

Is there any other country with such plans and support of nuclear energy?


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PostPosted: Feb 06, 2014 7:44 pm 
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Ignalina NPP produced more power than Lithuania consumed until it lost its first unit to the EU mandated shutdown.


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PostPosted: Feb 06, 2014 7:56 pm 
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Ah right, i forgot about it. But I read that the Lithuanians had a referendum about new nuclear reactors/plants and they rejected it, what a shame :cry: .

Maybe you could argue that the Ignalina was built as a part of the Soviet Union energy mix so thats why it had a large share in Lithuania.

But are you sure about the number?

I found this http://www.iae.lt/en/about-us/history/?page=2

Quote:
In 1993 INPP produced record amount of electricity – 12, 26 billion kWh or 88,1 percent of electricity necessary for the state. This figure was recorded in the Guinness Book of Records as the largest contribution to the common electricity production in the world’s nuclear history.


So no country had 100% then?


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PostPosted: Feb 06, 2014 8:26 pm 
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Nuclear as a major part of the energy mix is very wise, to my limited thinking.
Even nuclear plants have diesel generators as an important part of safety. The decay heat of used nuclear fuel could be used as a safe, assured power supply if used as thermo-electric without any moving parts. It could be a cheaper though not mobile version of RTG from Pu-238 used in space.


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PostPosted: Feb 07, 2014 5:03 pm 
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"I know its sounds ridiculous, but our politicians are also planning to build another big nuclear power plant after 2025 :shock: . I should also note, that we were forced to shut down 2 perfectly fine reactors as a condition to be permitted into the European Union. If we had those 2 reactors still operational, then we would achieve 100% of nuclear share maybe even in 2015."

Sounds like a smart plan.

Since Germany is shutting down their nukes and is building lignite plants, they may be in the market to import some Carbon Dioxide free energy in the future. I would imagine the EU will be increasingly supportive of Carbon free energy as time goes by. These politicians may make those new nukes into cash cows for the country.


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PostPosted: Feb 08, 2014 4:34 am 
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Eino wrote:
Since Germany is shutting down their nukes and is building lignite plants, they may be in the market to import some Carbon Dioxide free energy in the future. I would imagine the EU will be increasingly supportive of Carbon free energy as time goes by. These politicians may make those new nukes into cash cows for the country.
Read California instead of Germany and Mexico instead of your country and you have my idea from a while back.

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PostPosted: Feb 08, 2014 9:16 am 
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"Read California instead of Germany and Mexico instead of your country and you have my idea from a while back.

I think it's been a reality for California for some time only the energy has not all been carbon free. I've heard the big 4 corners coal plant in New Mexico largely serves California. This is probably true for he Palo Verde nuclear plant and I know much of the hydro from the Columbia Basin and Pacific Northwest serves California.

California's economy hasn't been what it used to be and the reluctance to accept industry, including power plants, may be a contributing factor.


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PostPosted: Feb 08, 2014 12:21 pm 
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Just to be sure - it looked like in my first post that i am shocked by this and i do not want this, but quite the opposite, i like it very much that we are pushing nuclear so hard :).

About Germany - i think that their "Energiewende" is not a right thing to do and that you cant go carbon free while simultaneously dont use nuclear (unless you have a lot of streams or geothermal energy like Iceland, Norway etc.). The fact is that we (Slovakia) or France, countries with really big nuclear share have a lot less CO2 emission (but not only CO2) than they have and our electricity is a lot cheaper too (i think the price in France is 1/2 of the price in Germany for households). And I really dont think that you can go 100% solar/wind because those plants arent operating 24/7 - you need to have gas backup powerplants... so whats the point then?
But its their choice, if they want it so, then so be it. But unfortunately they (Germany, Austria etc.) are also "attacking" nuclear on the EU level, which isnt that cool :| .


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PostPosted: Feb 10, 2014 12:33 pm 
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I think it is very wise for Slovakia to make the move to all nuclear, and I'm happy for them since my grandparents were from the Kosice area. Not only would exporting electricity be a great money maker, but having very cheap electricity will bring in more industry, especially those that consume large amounts of electricity. I'm thinking of aluminum production and electric mini mills for steel. I'm sure there are a host of others.


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PostPosted: Feb 10, 2014 10:51 pm 
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Their other option is to buy gas from Russia....hum. I see why they wish to be more independent.


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PostPosted: Feb 14, 2014 1:34 pm 
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We were cut off from that russian gas supply few years ago because Ukraine wasnt happy with the price it should pay for it to Russia, so they just stopped the whole pipeline for many days and we didnt have any other source of it. If you are interested, you can read more here - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2009_Russi ... as_dispute

Jim L. - its very nice to hear that you know such details about you ancestry, actually i live quite near Kosice. I have stumbled upon an article about American people of Slovak descent on wikipedia previously and it was quite a surprise to find out that for example Joe Sestak (thorium supporter by the way) or Jesse Ventura have Slovakian ancestry :).

By the way, i do not want to derail my own topic too much, if somebody knows about a country which will have a big share of nuclear energy in the future, lets discuss it :).


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PostPosted: Feb 18, 2014 2:19 pm 
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Adno wrote:
Hi there,

i am new here, but i am long term supporter of thorium energy. I was thinking today about this:

Do you think that there will be a country in the not that distant future that can produce 100% of its consumed electricity from nuclear power plants? What was the highest nuclear share of electricity production in any country (not just today, but also in the past)?

I am from Slovakia and we are second overall (from % perspective) behind France, but 2 new reactors are coming online this, respectively next year.


Am I wrong or in Slovakia a lot of nuclear energy is used for low temperature thermal purposes, too, for istance district heating or industrial uses (for example, paper production) ? I think it's an important point because when a country is "saturated" as electric capacity, there is also a lot of uses of nuclear as low temp heat, besides the obvious action to extend that low cost, low emissions nuclear electricity to other non-conventional uses (public transportation, electric cars and heat pumps or even the production of synthetic fuels)

Quote:
Is there any other country with such plans and support of nuclear energy?


According to the WNA
http://www.world-nuclear.org/info/Facts ... uirements/
Slovakia and Slovenia are the highest as %, but other countries are more demanding as nuclear kWh per capita, e.g. Switzerland and Sweden in particural with its > 60 TWh/year for a population of only ~ 10 millions of people


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PostPosted: Feb 18, 2014 3:59 pm 
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Alex P wrote:
According to the WNA
http://www.world-nuclear.org/info/Facts ... uirements/
Slovakia and Slovenia are the highest as %, but other countries are more demanding as nuclear kWh per capita, e.g. Switzerland and Sweden in particural with its > 60 TWh/year for a population of only ~ 10 millions of people
Well, highest after France.

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PostPosted: Feb 19, 2014 5:51 am 
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Some U.S. states would also do well in such a league table, if they would be considered as "countries". Illinois (more people than Belgium or Sweden), South Carolina, New Hampshire and Vermont all have more than 50% of electricity coming from nuclear.


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PostPosted: Feb 20, 2014 6:57 am 
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KitemanSA wrote:
Well, highest after France.


Well, I' m pretty sure that Slovakia and other eastern Europe countries (and the Swisses, too), unlike France, use a lot of nuclear heat for different thermal puropes (district heating, process heat, etc...) as well


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