Energy From Thorium Discussion Forum

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PostPosted: Dec 08, 2014 9:20 am 
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Joined: Jun 19, 2013 11:49 am
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Well, I have been doing quite a lot of thinking about the use of steam for industrial purposes in recent weeks, and after much research it appears that those demands are not really as strong an argument for pursuing high temperature reactors as they first appear.

There has been an increasing trend in recent decades, for example, to reduce the temperature at which atmospheric distillation of hydrocarbons in oil refineries is carried out - with the development of multi-stage preflashing equipment and more use of reduced pressures to reduce boiling points. This has been pursued primarily to reduce the prospect of coking inside the distilling tower but it has the interesting effect that large quantities of the energy required for the distillation can be provided at reduced temperatures.

There are other examples, and in many cases where higher steam temperatures than those available to, say, a BWR the pressure is far lower - which permits use of a natural gas (or even in off peak times an electrically) fired super-heater that will still allow for drastic reductions in gas demand.

So the question becomes - how much industrial heat actually requires very high temperatures to be useful?


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PostPosted: Dec 08, 2014 9:41 am 
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Joined: Sep 22, 2013 6:43 am
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Location: Prescott, AZ USA
Making cement requires high temps but I am not sure how hot.

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PostPosted: Dec 08, 2014 12:10 pm 
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So hot the only nuclear system likely to work is an electric arc.


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PostPosted: Dec 08, 2014 10:09 pm 
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Joined: Aug 29, 2008 4:55 pm
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Location: Idaho Falls, Idaho
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portland_cement

Portland cement clinker is made by heating, in a cement kiln, a mixture of raw materials to a calcining temperature of above 600 °C (1,112 °F) and then a fusion temperature, which is about 1,450 °C (2,640 °F) for modern cements, to sinter the materials into clinker.


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PostPosted: Dec 09, 2014 10:33 am 
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The high temperature nuclear industrial steam can be used not only for softening the tight oil but also hydrous pyrolysis of organic matter and underground fossil fuels.


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