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PostPosted: Sep 13, 2009 12:55 am 
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gehinjc wrote:
One option considered was for DOE to build a dedicated LWR to produce tritium, which is fundamentally not different than the current situation, and they likely would have contracted TVA or another organization to run the reactor (like they contracted out the operation of the production reactors).


Hmmm... maybe that could have been an AP-1000? Would they have needed two, or three? :)

And, when was the last time a weapons program was both non-proliferative and profit making?

-Iain


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PostPosted: Sep 17, 2009 2:41 pm 
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Paying off the locals...

Roane Wastes No Time With TVA Funds: Group Already Spends $6.7M on Various Projects

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It took a new foundation 28 minutes Wednesday to spend more than $6.7 million from a special $40 million TVA allocation set aside to boost Roane County as a result of the disastrous coal ash spill.

Projects approved include renovating the historic Princess Theater in downtown Harriman for use as a regional cultural and educational center at the price of $1.7 million and doubling the size of the Kingston wastewater treatment plant at an estimated cost of $5 million.

Members of the Roane County Economic Development Foundation also agreed to chip in nearly $32,000 to help resurface the entrance to the Roane County Industrial Park in Rockwood to make it more presentable as the county courts a supplier of the new Volkswagen plant going up in Chattanooga.

TVA executive Anda Ray, a member of the foundation, wondered how a rehab of the Princess Theater would spur economic development. Harriman Mayor Chris Mason said the 900-seat theater would become a "cultural centerpiece for our region" and be an extension of the city's Roane State Community College campus. "It's something we need to do to revitalize downtown," Mason said.


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PostPosted: Nov 22, 2009 5:06 pm 
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TVA studies Bellefonte Unit 1 savings

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Faced with budget and cost pressures, TVA is looking closely at completing a long-dormant nuclear reactor at its Bellefonte plant near Scottsboro, some 30 years after the project began.

Tennessee Valley Authority officials said it may be more cost effective to complete Unit 1 at Bellefonte before beginning a next-generation reactor currently being designed by Westinghouse.

TVA has submitted a combined operating and construction license application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission for two new reactors at Bellefonte, called Units 3 and 4, but that project may take a back seat.

TVA officials have a target for power generation from the Bellefonte plant by 2018-2020.

However, the agency is facing a roughly $1 billion cleanup bill associated with the 2008 coal ash spill near Kingston, Tenn., and possible new costs associated with federal mandates on greenhouse gas emissions.


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PostPosted: Nov 22, 2009 6:14 pm 
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However, the agency is facing a roughly $1 billion cleanup bill associated with the 2008 coal ash spill near Kingston, Tenn.,

Wow ! ....that's steep !!


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PostPosted: Feb 10, 2010 5:53 pm 
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JoelUpchurch wrote:
Has anybody else noticed that all the members of the TVA board of directors are due to be replaced by President Obama before the end of his term? I suspect any nuclear plans will be shut down and we will have a lot of windmills again
Suspects look likely to be acquitted, though....
WNN wrote:
Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA's) proposed expansion of its nuclear power plant fleet is likely to get the backing of its board of directors after four nominees to the board expressed support for nuclear energy during a US Senate confirmation hearing.

Kirk Sorensen wrote:
www.rockymounttelegram.com wrote:
President Barack Obama's Tennessee Valley Authority board nominee Neil G. McBride.......began his legal career as a staff attorney with consumer advocate Ralph Nader.....
But...
McBride wrote:
In the short run, additional generation needs to come almost surely from new nuclear
Ralph will not be happy :mrgreen:


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PostPosted: Feb 10, 2010 11:00 pm 
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Luke wrote:
JoelUpchurch wrote:
Has anybody else noticed that all the members of the TVA board of directors are due to be replaced by President Obama before the end of his term? I suspect any nuclear plans will be shut down and we will have a lot of windmills again
Suspects look likely to be acquitted, though....
WNN wrote:
Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA's) proposed expansion of its nuclear power plant fleet is likely to get the backing of its board of directors after four nominees to the board expressed support for nuclear energy during a US Senate confirmation hearing.


I hope you are right. I read their statements and I think everyone but Sansom's might be subject to some interpretation. The fact that Sansom has been renominated is promising though.


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PostPosted: Feb 11, 2018 1:38 pm 
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TVA plots new future with stagnant or declining demand for power

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TVA's total power load last year was down by more than 10 percent from a decade ago and the federal utility projects demand for electricity will be essentially flat or down even more over the next decade. TVA, which long banked on annual electricity growth of as much as 7 percent, now predicts power demand in 2027 will be nearly 13 percent below the peak level reached 20 years earlier in 2007.


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PostPosted: Feb 19, 2018 5:36 pm 
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Is Trump's proposal to dump TVA really such a loony idea?

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Although TVA operates without taxpayer infusions, it also doesn't pay taxes, and its payments in lieu of taxes total far less than a private utility would pay to support local government. TVA has tended to be lackadaisical about debt. As a government entity, it can borrow more cheaply than private enterprise, and its debt has, at times, approached its $30 billion ceiling, though it's now on a downward trajectory.


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PostPosted: Feb 21, 2018 7:33 am 
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TVA boosting power output at Browns Ferry with $475 million upgrade

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Following a record-long 653-day run of power generation at the Browns Ferry Nuclear Power Plant, TVA idled the Unit 3 reactor at Browns Ferry over the holiday weekend and started Saturday to install equipment to add another 155 megawatts of generating power from the boiling water reactor. Similar upgrades are planned on the two other units at Browns Ferry as part of a $475 million program to boost overall power by 465 megawatts by the spring of 2019.

The extra power from the Extended Power Uprate, or EPU, is projected to produce enough additional electricity to power 280,000 more homes and will help TVA boost the share of power it gets from its nuclear power plants to 40 percent.

The power upgrade is far less costly than building new nuclear generation. TVA spent $4.7 billion to add a 1,200 megawatt Unit 2 reactor at Watts Bar in 2016 — or more than $3.9 million per installed megawatt — compared with only $1.02 million per megawatt for the upgraded Browns Ferry units. At Plant Vogtle in Georgia, the new AP1000 reactors are projected to cost more than $6.4 million per megawatt.


It's humbling when you realize that you could build an entire reactor whose output would be less than the uprating of these older reactors.


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PostPosted: Mar 11, 2018 8:34 am 
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This is way back in the annals of TVA history, but S. David Freeman is like a smelly old turd that keeps sticking to your shoe:

'Green cowboy' who advised presidents worries the left is lost

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Freeman, whose first name is Simon but who goes by Dave, is used to being a lightning rod in the energy community. He quashed the development of new nuclear reactors when he helmed the Tennessee Valley Authority in the 1970s and was accused by Republicans of gouging ratepayers during the energy crisis of 2001.

But these days, Freeman is more focused on his nine grandchildren as he makes the rounds on Capitol Hill to push for legislation to pivot the United States to only renewable energy by 2050.


Freeman is clearly hoping to wreck the world's economy before he dies.


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PostPosted: May 06, 2018 6:52 pm 
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TVA doubles net income as colder weather boosts power sales during winter

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Frigid winter temperatures helped to more than double the cold cash earned by the Tennessee Valley Authority in the first three months of 2018 even though the price of power was cheaper than a year ago. TVA said its sales of electricity in the first quarter of calendar 2018 were up 9 percent over a year ago due to a colder-than-normal weather, which pushed up power usage in the majority of homes and businesses that heat their houses and buildings with electricity in TVA's 7-state region. With more plentiful rains boosting hydroelectric generation and cheaper supplies of natural gas, TVA's price of power still fell by a tenth of a penny from 6.9 cents per kilowatthour a year ago to 6.8 cents per kilowatthour this year. TVA President Bill Johnson said the completion of new natural gas plants and another nuclear reactor in the past couple of years, combined with more than $600 million of annual expense cuts and extra rainfall from Mother Nature, have positioned TVA to both boost earnings and cut its monthly fuel cost adjustment. TVA said Friday its net income in the first three months of the year totaled $462 million on sales of $2.75 billion. At the current pace of earnings, TVA could top the record high $1.2 billion earned in fiscal 2016.


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PostPosted: Jul 26, 2018 7:03 am 
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TVA boosts power output at newest Browns Ferry reactor


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PostPosted: Sep 11, 2018 10:57 pm 
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Power demand may slow, requiring more flexibility for TVA

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The Tennessee Valley Authority needs to have more flexibility as America's biggest government utility adapts to a changing power market with a less certain future, according to the architects of a new 20-year strategic plan. Unlike previous long-term power plans which differed only in how much electricity demand would rise, TVA's new integrated resource plan taking shape by power planners foresees a possible decline in power use in the Tennessee Valley. Although the demand for TVA-generated power once grew by more than 7 percent a year, electricity demand in the Valley appears to have peaked nearly a decade ago and TVA President Bill Johnson said he expects only flat to declining demand in the future. But electric-powered vehicles and more economic growth could still push up future power demand, especially during summertime and winter peaks. Hunter Hydas, project manger for the Integrated Resource Plan, said the key to success for TVA in the future will be flexibility in its power portfolio and response capabilities as more consumers generate their own electricity from rooftop solar and wind turbines while still relying upon TVA for power when the wind doesn't blow or the sun doesn't shun. "In the last integrated resource plan (released in 2015), all scenarios had increasing energy utilization across the 20-year planning horizon," Hydas said Monday during a public, online update of TVA's long-range plan. "For the 2019 plan, we have designed a much wider band of potential futures for energy escalation or de-escalation." TVA, which has shut down more than half of the 59 coal-fired generation units it once operated, is looking at closing the last remaining unit at the Paradise Fossil Plant in Kentucky and the single-unit Bull Run Fossil plant near Oak Ridge. Within the next 20 years, other aging TVA coal plants at Kingston, Shawnee and Gallatin could enter the end of their useful lives and the extended license for the reactors at the Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant will expire and TVA must decide whether to ask for another extension of its oldest nuclear plant or shut down the reactors. Within the next five to 10 years, other long-term power purchase agreement with other energy producers also will end and will have to be either extended, renegotiated or terminated. TVA is trying to develop its 20-year plan for the future — along with the required Environmental Impact Statement for its future plans — for public release in February. Following pubic hearings and comments, TVA directors will vote on the long-range power plan next August when it takes up the 2020 fiscal budget. The goals of the new long-range plan include low cost energy, limited risk, environmental responsibility, delivering reliable power and diversity of power supply. As in the 2015 long-range plan, TVA is collaborating with its IRP Working Group and the Regional Energy Resource Council (RERC) to help develop and shape the new power plan.


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PostPosted: Sep 21, 2018 1:06 pm 
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TVA, environmental groups duel over the future of solar energy

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Just about 13 percent of that power now comes from renewable sources, and only 3 percent from wind and solar, according to TVA’s figures. The latter figure is expected to grow over the next decade. But not by much, compared to other power sources. “Solar only operates when the sun shines and wind only works when the wind blows,” TVA spokesman Scott Brooks said via email. “Even hydroelectric power is dependent on the availability of water, which can be more limited in drought conditions.” That requires TVA to have other sources, such as nuclear, natural gas and coal to provide steady power around the clock, he said. Environmental groups say TVA could be doing much more — and that comparable utilities are.


Pro-solar anti-nukes know that they have public opinion on their side. But not physics or engineering. Hence the problem.


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PostPosted: Oct 13, 2018 10:26 pm 
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Kirk Sorensen wrote:
TVA, environmental groups duel over the future of solar energy

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Just about 13 percent of that power now comes from renewable sources, and only 3 percent from wind and solar, according to TVA’s figures. The latter figure is expected to grow over the next decade. But not by much, compared to other power sources. “Solar only operates when the sun shines and wind only works when the wind blows,” TVA spokesman Scott Brooks said via email. “Even hydroelectric power is dependent on the availability of water, which can be more limited in drought conditions.” That requires TVA to have other sources, such as nuclear, natural gas and coal to provide steady power around the clock, he said. Environmental groups say TVA could be doing much more — and that comparable utilities are.


Pro-solar anti-nukes know that they have public opinion on their side. But not physics or engineering. Hence the problem.


TVA has energy storage that wind and solar require to become replacements for coal, natural gas, and even nuclear. I made an unplanned detour while on vacation once to visit one of the facilities, I saw a sign pointing it out and decided to take a look.
https://www.tva.gov/Energy/Our-Power-Sy ... n-Mountain

This facility is a pumped hydro storage dam, capable of producing 1.6 GW of electricity. They use it for daily and seasonal load balancing for the nuclear and coal plants they manage. That should allow for a lot of wind and solar on the grid within the region. So, what's the problem?

My guess is that economics is a problem. Solar power is still quite expensive, even with a pumped hydro storage facility nearby. Wind is far cheaper but still has costs attached in the need for this storage. Raccoon Mountain is a big dam but that's not unlimited storage, there will be limits to how much wind and solar that can be added before even 1.6 GW of storage is not enough to keep the grid stable.

_________________
Disclaimer: I am an engineer but not a nuclear engineer, mechanical engineer, chemical engineer, or industrial engineer. My education included electrical, computer, and software engineering.


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