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PostPosted: Oct 30, 2012 5:51 am 
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Hitachi's £700m Horizon nuclear deal to create up to 12,000 British jobs

Quote:
Horizon has 90 staff based in Gloucester and is developing plans for a series of new nuclear power stations at Wylfa on the Isle of Anglesey and at Oldbury-on-Severn in Gloucestershire. Hitachi plans to build at least two of its Advanced Boiling Water Reactors (ABWR) at each location.

and
Quote:
Hitachi had been seen as an unlikely buyer because its ABWR has yet to begin the approval process for use in the UK. This could take up to four years - raising fears of further delays to delivery, but the group said in its statement that it would "immediately work towards" achieving the appropriate licences. However, the design has also already been approved elsewhere, such as the US and Hitachi has a track record of building ABWRs on budget in Japan in less than four years, which is quicker than its rivals.


In Japan Hitachi has built them in a remarkable 39 months from first concrete to first fuel load proven:

ABWR Nuclear Power Plant

UK regulatory authorities will take longer than that to fool around rubber stamping a design already approved in the US and Japan.


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PostPosted: Oct 30, 2012 7:17 am 
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Where does GE fit in ? Haven't Hitachi and General Electric merged their nuclear businesses in a combined business, called GE-Hitachi Nuclear ? In another news report there is talk about a Hitachi/SNC-Lavalin consortium. SNC-Lavalin is the Canadian company which has taken over AECL's CANDU division. So could ESBWRs and CANDUs also be options for Britain ?


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PostPosted: Oct 31, 2012 4:38 am 
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camiel wrote:
Where does GE fit in ? Haven't Hitachi and General Electric merged their nuclear businesses in a combined business, called GE-Hitachi Nuclear ? In another news report there is talk about a Hitachi/SNC-Lavalin consortium. SNC-Lavalin is the Canadian company which has taken over AECL's CANDU division. So could ESBWRs and CANDUs also be options for Britain ?


Yes, ABWR, ESBWR and ABWR-II are GE-H projects. But as discussed earlier on the forum, GE isn't a serious nuclear builder anymore, and likely is exiting nuclear new build altogether. In a healthy market there would be others such as Siemens that could take over. But the market is unhealthy with several major players exiting or soon exiting nuclear new build. Which is bad bad news for all these designs.

The best hope is that Hitachi continues alone.

As for CANDU's it isn't looking any better, with so many people fired you can't enter aggressive growth international markets.


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PostPosted: Oct 31, 2012 5:22 am 
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'Producing around 1300 MWe each, Hitachi's total fleet of British ABWRs could reach 7800 MWe. This compares to Horizon's previous plan to build up to 6600 MWe, with all of that fleet in operation by 2025. Hitachi has not yet made public who it intends to operate the units - whether it will develop its own capability or find a partner.'

http://www.world-nuclear-news.org/C_Hor ... 10122.html

Anyone got any idea why they are going for the ABWR rather than the more advanced ESBWR?


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PostPosted: Oct 31, 2012 7:37 am 
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DaveMart wrote:
'Producing around 1300 MWe each, Hitachi's total fleet of British ABWRs could reach 7800 MWe. This compares to Horizon's previous plan to build up to 6600 MWe, with all of that fleet in operation by 2025. Hitachi has not yet made public who it intends to operate the units - whether it will develop its own capability or find a partner.'

http://www.world-nuclear-news.org/C_Hor ... 10122.html

Anyone got any idea why they are going for the ABWR rather than the more advanced ESBWR?


A big reason is that ABWR is fully engineered, licensed, constructed, and operating with several units. That means lower risk to investors, very important in the world of nuclear new build.

ESBWR seems stuck at the end of the engineering/licensing phase because of lack of commitment from GE.

Most projects in the US, that were initially ESBWR, switched to ABWR later on.

ABWRs are very safe. There was at least one unit that got hit by the 2011 tsunami on the eastern coast of Japan. The ABWR there (Hamaoka IIRC) didn't even flinch.


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PostPosted: Oct 31, 2012 8:20 am 
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This quote supports the assertion that GE is exiting nuclear new build:

Quote:
Hitachi said it will work with Babcock International and Rolls-Royce to "plan and deliver" the new build program. Rolls-Royce said it would explore with Hitachi how it could offer support through its manufacturing, engineering and technical services. It would also like to develop opportunities in nuclear instrumentation and control.


These are some strong partners. Rolls Royce entering the nuclear new build market internationally is good news in today's tough market.


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PostPosted: Oct 31, 2012 8:23 am 
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Wikipedia article said ABWRs have had problems in Japan and were running below rated power. Anyone know about that?


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PostPosted: Oct 31, 2012 8:30 am 
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Wikipedia wrote:
2009, August 11 - Units 4 and 5 (the only ones operating) automatically shut down due to an earthquake
2011, May 6 - Prime minister Naoto Kan orders Units 4 and 5 to be shut down and Unit 3 not to be restarted
2011, May 15 - 400 tons of seawater were found to have leaked into the Unit 5 turbine steam condenser
2011, May 20 - Damaged pipes were located in the Unit 5 condenser and the operator estimated that about 5 tons of seawater may have entered the reactor itself.

FYI Unit 5 is the ABWR.
For some reason, the Japanese seem to have difficulty with pipes.

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PostPosted: Oct 31, 2012 10:20 am 
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KitemanSA wrote:
Wikipedia wrote:
2009, August 11 - Units 4 and 5 (the only ones operating) automatically shut down due to an earthquake
2011, May 6 - Prime minister Naoto Kan orders Units 4 and 5 to be shut down and Unit 3 not to be restarted
2011, May 15 - 400 tons of seawater were found to have leaked into the Unit 5 turbine steam condenser
2011, May 20 - Damaged pipes were located in the Unit 5 condenser and the operator estimated that about 5 tons of seawater may have entered the reactor itself.

FYI Unit 5 is the ABWR.
For some reason, the Japanese seem to have difficulty with pipes.


Wow, some seawater entered the condenser. This happens about every year in the coal gas fired seawater cooling facility my company did some work for. Same consequences for public health, but no Wiki entry, press attention, and general hyperbole.

The nuclear research and medical isotopes reactor here had a pipe leak some time ago. Not even a critical pipe for cooling. Just a small pipe. It was all over the news, headline pages. Lots of fuss over nothing.

Everyone has problems with pipes.

This is the problem with nuclear power. If an operator spills his cup of coffee over the desk, the news media will report it as "spill at nuclear plant".

Basically people don't understand how a nuclear plant works so they are easy to scare.


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PostPosted: Oct 31, 2012 2:45 pm 
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KitemanSA wrote:
Wikipedia wrote:
2009, August 11 - Units 4 and 5 (the only ones operating) automatically shut down due to an earthquake
2011, May 6 - Prime minister Naoto Kan orders Units 4 and 5 to be shut down and Unit 3 not to be restarted
2011, May 15 - 400 tons of seawater were found to have leaked into the Unit 5 turbine steam condenser
2011, May 20 - Damaged pipes were located in the Unit 5 condenser and the operator estimated that about 5 tons of seawater may have entered the reactor itself.

FYI Unit 5 is the ABWR.
For some reason, the Japanese seem to have difficulty with pipes.

Sounds like 'condenseritis', but the only challenge should be be fixing the condenser, conductivity probes in the hotwell should have rejected the contaminated condensate immediately with no impact on the core. For any seawater cooled plant condenser leaks are an obvious and occasionally common mode of failure in some designs, therefore they have protection scheme specifically designed to respond to that event.


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PostPosted: Nov 01, 2012 1:38 pm 
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Cyril R wrote:
This quote supports the assertion that GE is exiting nuclear new build:


There are changes in leadership at companies too. Immelt is almost more a finance than a manufacturing guy (which is probably depressing for a good part of the company). Unfortunately that is where all the money has been in America the past few decades. However, given GE's importance in the original buildout of the American fleet, I haven't given up hope on them yet.

The ESBWR is very close to approval in the United States. Given how painful that is, it would seem insane not to promote it. If Hitachi has the full rights to the design, maybe they will indeed go without GE.


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PostPosted: Nov 02, 2012 7:41 am 
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Hmm, it appears Toshiba is also offering the ABWR, and they have a version already adapted to the European Utility Requirements (EUR), the EU-ABWR:

http://www.iaea.org/NuclearPower/Downlo ... ibashi.pdf

Definately an improved version of the ABWR. It appears to be based on the US-ABWR, already an improvement of the Japanese ABWRs. It appears to have passive decay heat cooling as well.

Sounds like competition for Hitachi!


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PostPosted: Nov 03, 2012 10:29 am 
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Read on WNA news that the GE/Hitachi joint venture will build the ABWR's. Maybe they can finally build an ESBWR as one of the later of the six planned.


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PostPosted: Nov 04, 2012 7:54 pm 
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Interestingly, the Germans got out of horizon as the home market in Germany has dried up due to govt policy change as a result of scare originating from Fukushima. The people from Japan itself are stepping in to keep their tools sharp while the Japan recovers from the blow and the home market recovers.


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PostPosted: Dec 16, 2012 2:22 am 
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EPR, approved for UK,is estimated to cost $11.1 Billion in France. UK costs are expected to be of the same order. http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/12/ ... 3146201212
Partly built Finnish reactor is expected to cost a similar amount.
http://www.world-nuclear-news.org/NN-EP ... 12127.html
This is $6800/kW. What are the Japanese projections?
Some time back, the Indian PHWR was quoted at $1700/kW.
http://nextbigfuture.com/2012/05/india- ... s-for.html
The cost of Indian Fast reactors has recently been quoted at Rs 100,000 per kW. This amounts to $1800/kW and is higher than actuals of PFBR. It must be 2012 projections.
Chinese and Russian costs are 50% or lower than the EPR. If the US can buy fuel from Russia, the UK could surely buy the reactors from these lower cost sources.


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