Gas-Cooled Fast Reactors

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sovietologist
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Joined: Aug 29, 2008 10:04 pm

Gas-Cooled Fast Reactors

Post by sovietologist » Jan 10, 2009 10:08 pm

Here's a question about one of the "other" Gen-IV proposals: I was wondering if anyone knew how emergency core heat removal is supposed to work in a gas-cooled fast reactor. It seems like an extremely difficult problem, given the high power density of a fast reactor and the sheer amount of gas that would need to be pumped through the core to remove decay heat. What are the proposed solutions to this issue?

Per Peterson
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Location: Berkeley, CA

Re: Gas-Cooled Fast Reactors

Post by Per Peterson » Jan 11, 2009 1:15 am

Emergency decay heat removal provides the largest challenge for the GFR, because the fuel has much less thermal inertia than for a thermal spectrum modular helium reactor. The safety approach is to place the primary system in a relatively small, low leakage containment, so that if a large break loss of coolant accident occurs, after the helium vents the pressure in the containment is still high enough that the core can be cooled by natural circulation of the helium (which would not be adequate at atmospheric pressure).

jagdish
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Joined: Apr 19, 2008 1:06 am

Re: Gas-Cooled Fast Reactors

Post by jagdish » Jan 11, 2009 5:02 am

A barrel shaped core with longer length compared to dia shall enable fffective heat transfer from solid fuel to gas. I am unable to load the sketch.

STG
Posts: 277
Joined: Oct 29, 2007 6:27 pm

Re: Gas-Cooled Fast Reactors

Post by STG » Jan 15, 2009 4:49 am

jagdish wrote:A barrel shaped core with longer length compared to dia shall enable fffective heat transfer from solid fuel to gas. I am unable to load the sketch.
In a fast core? doesn't that result in high leakages and difficulties to reach criticallity?

And as far as I know, they try to increase the thermal inertia of the fuel by using cermaics and special kind of cladding...refractory cladding or so...
Liking All Nuclear Systems, But Looking At Them Through Dark And Critical Glasses.

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