Cr-Mo-V-W: high-entropy metal alloy

Asteroza
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Joined: Feb 25, 2011 1:55 am

Cr-Mo-V-W: high-entropy metal alloy

Post by Asteroza » Sep 19, 2018 6:11 pm

Potentially interesting high temperature alloy, part of the recently interesting high entropy metal alloy research thrust.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/a ... 6218305359

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nipo
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Joined: Jul 26, 2018 3:23 am

Re: Cr-Mo-V-W: high-entropy metal alloy

Post by nipo » Sep 20, 2018 6:05 am

Could that be used in a fast breeder reactor?

I noticed also the high melting point.
Transuranic heavy elements may not be used where there is life.
– Sapphire & Steel intro

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nipo
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Re: Cr-Mo-V-W: high-entropy metal alloy

Post by nipo » Sep 20, 2018 7:08 am

Would that alloy resist corrosivity of molten lead, molten plutonium trichloride, and molten uranium trichloride?

The alloy is interesting even if it didn't.
Transuranic heavy elements may not be used where there is life.
– Sapphire & Steel intro

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nipo
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Re: Cr-Mo-V-W: high-entropy metal alloy

Post by nipo » Sep 22, 2018 8:57 am

It was one month ago when I read about high-entropy metal alloys. I got interested because I thought that perhaps it was possible to create an alloy that would withstand the high temperature and corrosion of a dual fluid reactor, and also be a good neutron reflector.

I reasoned that neutron absorption is the property most avoided when choosing a reflector material.

So I created a table which I just finished today. It shows elements and their most abundant isotopes. I excluded most elements as probably not useful, starting from noble gases, etc. Then there were also few elements that are very scarce, and I did not even have their cross sections, so I left them out too.

Anyway here is the table I created. The document is a one page PDF.

Color blue means that the element or isotope may be most interesting. It means high melting point temperature at least 2000 °C, or low neutron absorption (Pb-208, B-11 and C-12 being the least absorbing). Light grey means semi good properties, such as melting point at least 1400 °C, or quite average neutron absorption. Red is very common colour in the table, and it marks low melting point temperature (such as lead and sodium) and high absorption (such as B-10, which is an extreme case).
Attachments
Absorption_cross_sections_of_nuclei.pdf
Absorption cross sections of nuclei
(259.36 KiB) Downloaded 54 times
Transuranic heavy elements may not be used where there is life.
– Sapphire & Steel intro

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